Earlier this year I wrote about medical imaging and how advanced materials are improving CT and nuclear imaging. That is, semiconductor sensors using CZT materials are lowering x-ray and photon dosages while at the same time improving image quality. This blog expands on the health theme by providing three more examples of how advanced materials will impact human health. Biosensors can help people monitor their health and seek treatment when necessary. Nano-particles can carry and target drug treatment inside a patient’s body, and antimicrobial coatings can substantially reduce the rate of infection.

Water – it is touched by technology in so many ways from pond (or aquifer, lake, ocean etc.) to tap and back again. Continued innovation helps us to remediate our waste; clean up accidents/spills more effectively, reduce the energy footprint of water treatment and provide distributed water in regions where infrastructure is lacking.

Demand for clean fresh water continues to grow and is estimated to increase by more than 40% by 2030. Any industry with such spectacular growth and opportunity for technology innovation demands a closer look – and at Pangaea Ventures, we have been looking closely for a number of years and made our first water investment in 2003. Also, the fact that water is essentially a perfect good and is a necessity for life doesn't hurt either.

It is often said that an ideal market for venture investing is a large market on the verge of massive disruption. It is for this reason that the medical imaging market recently came onto my radar. It is a multi-billion dollar market that is on the verge of massive technology and market disruption.

The core technology for radiation-based medical imaging cameras are scintillators. This detector technology was first adopted around 1985 and is comprised of scintillator crystals that convert x-rays and radiation into visible light and a photodiode or photomultiplier tube that converts the light to an electric signal. Sounds like old technology.

Black Spots On The Green Revolution

Posted by on in Health

In 1968, William Gaud, director of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) coined "the Green Revolution" as a term for the massive impact new technologies were having on agriculture: Synthetic fertilizers, hybrid crops, improved irrigation and the introduction of synthetic pesticides. The Green Revolution had actually begun twenty-five years earlier in Mexico with the work of Norman Borlaug, and established an era where crop yields would increase by 50% per decade.

Biopesticides: The next crop of cleantech home runs

Posted by on in Health

Can you name a cleantech subsector that has generated five or more grand slam VC exits (>10x, >100% IRR) in the past 2 years? Tough, isn't it? But there is an answer: Biopesticides. Biopesticides are pesticides derived from natural organisms, although the EPA definition also allows for substances derived from natural minerals.