Materials for the Masses, part 2

Posted by on in Advanced Materials

In part 1 of this blog, I used water and food as a starting place for how advanced materials are making our world better by improving quality of life in the developing world. I covered topics such as desalination, air conditioning, turning natural gas into food, and even eating bugs!

Materials for the Masses, part 1

Posted by on in Advanced Materials

Recently, Pangaea has been working on a number of opportunities that might not only make our world better (in terms of sustainability), but also look like they can make our lives better (in terms of quality of life). And when I say "our lives", I mean everybody's lives. In this two-part blog, I want to provide a brief overview of some of the opportunities we are following that we think can help raise the standard of living for some of the poorest people on the planet.

Biology: The New Building Blocks

Posted by on in Sustainability

I think it’s safe to say the cat is out of the bag when it comes to Synthetic biology. In case you missed it, a synbio start-up company called Zymergen, commercializing a biology-driven materials discovery platform, raised a whopping $44M in its series A mid-June 2015. While this is a big A round by any standards, it’s even more significant when looking back at the performance of venture-backed industrial biotech and biofuel companies over the last decade (reminder - it’s not a pretty picture).

Portfolio Spotlight: CarbonCure

Posted by on in Video



BNN interview with CarbonCure CEO Robert Niven.  CarbonCure retrofits concrete plants with a technology that recycles waste carbon dioxide to make affordable, greener concrete products.

In the worlds of Solid-State Physics and Materials Science, it is pretty common for exciting materials phenomenon to be predicted before they’re ever experimentally verified in the physical world. However, this typically occurs years, decades, or even centuries before commercial applications become viable and sustainable businesses can be formed. Many times, these jumps from prediction to demonstration to commercialization are never truly made.