What is Your Materials MVP?

Posted by on in Advanced Materials

A Minimal Viable Product (MVP), is a new product that can be rapidly developed in order to efficiently test the value proposition with real customers. The ultimate goal is to accelerate the innovation cycle towards creating the real home run. Eric Ries originally outlined this methodology in his book, “The Lean Startup”, and it has inspired the formation of countless software start-ups that can deliver that MVP with pizza-fueled coding marathons. But for companies looking to commercialize products based on advanced materials, there are typically a myriad of technical, commercial, and regulatory roadblocks that make executing on a MVP much more difficult and time consuming. But this concept is too valuable to be ignored by early stage advanced materials enabled companies.

"I'd put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power! I hope we don't have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that." We have come a long way since these words of wisdom from Thomas Edison way back in 1931! Solar energy or photovoltaic (PV), a key component in the renewable energy mix, continues to grow, with a record 57 GWp installed in 2015. The compound annual growth rate of PV installations was 41 % in the 2000 to 2015 period (Fraunhofer ISE). Wafer-based crystalline silicon is still the dominant technology, accounting for more than 90% of global PV production. Still playing catch up are the many thin film technologies led by cadmium telluride (CdTe). The early predictions of thin film technologies surge did not materialize, resulting in the failure of many startups. But the technologies are alive and well, amidst continuing efforts to lower cost and improve conversion efficiency. Advanced materials still hold the keys to success in the race to boost PV efficiency levels.

Metamaterials Blog (with Meta Title)

Posted by on in Electronics

Below you will find the prognostications I was able to record from an advanced materials venture capitalist whom I know well. I’m afraid that some of the knowledge gained from our dialogues has been lost to antiquity and general forgetfulness, but I have placed what remains here on this digital repository for blogs written by advanced materials venture capitalists:

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner and the Airbus A350 airplanes are two early examples. What sets these planes apart from older planes is that their body and wings are made of composite materials rather than aluminum. They are more fuel efficient and fly farther. This reduces the cost of travel and opens up new routes. Passengers also enjoy benefits like increased humidity and cabin pressure. Humidity is increased from 4% to 15% and cabin pressure is increased from the equivalent of 8,000 feet above sea level to 6,000 feet above sea level. The bottom line is that these planes cost less to operate and provide passengers with ground level comfort and less jet leg.

Advancing the Science of Automotive Glazing

Posted by on in Video

Doug Wiggin, CEO of Switch Materials, gives a talk on the commercialization of smart windows for the automotive sector, as part of Pangaea Ventures' Advanced Materials Commercialization Summit.