What is Your Materials MVP?

Posted by on in Advanced Materials

A Minimal Viable Product (MVP), is a new product that can be rapidly developed in order to efficiently test the value proposition with real customers. The ultimate goal is to accelerate the innovation cycle towards creating the real home run. Eric Ries originally outlined this methodology in his book, “The Lean Startup”, and it has inspired the formation of countless software start-ups that can deliver that MVP with pizza-fueled coding marathons. But for companies looking to commercialize products based on advanced materials, there are typically a myriad of technical, commercial, and regulatory roadblocks that make executing on a MVP much more difficult and time consuming. But this concept is too valuable to be ignored by early stage advanced materials enabled companies.

We generate a tremendous amount of data from an exponentially growing number of connected devices. The entire internet (and all the data we host on the cloud) is forecast to reach 16,000 exabytes by 2017 (an exabyte is 1 billion gigabytes). That’s a lot of warehouses & data storage centers [whether all of it should be stored is the topic of a very different post…and yes I DO need ALL of those puppy videos, thank you for asking!].

Materials for the Masses, part 2

Posted by on in Advanced Materials

In part 1 of this blog, I used water and food as a starting place for how advanced materials are making our world better by improving quality of life in the developing world. I covered topics such as desalination, air conditioning, turning natural gas into food, and even eating bugs!

Materials for the Masses, part 1

Posted by on in Advanced Materials

Recently, Pangaea has been working on a number of opportunities that might not only make our world better (in terms of sustainability), but also look like they can make our lives better (in terms of quality of life). And when I say "our lives", I mean everybody's lives. In this two-part blog, I want to provide a brief overview of some of the opportunities we are following that we think can help raise the standard of living for some of the poorest people on the planet.

In the worlds of Solid-State Physics and Materials Science, it is pretty common for exciting materials phenomenon to be predicted before they’re ever experimentally verified in the physical world. However, this typically occurs years, decades, or even centuries before commercial applications become viable and sustainable businesses can be formed. Many times, these jumps from prediction to demonstration to commercialization are never truly made.