Andrew Haughian

Andrew Haughian

Partner, Pangaea Ventures Ltd. Andrew has over 12 years of energy and industrial experience, recently leading several of Pangaea’s investments in the energy generation, energy storage and energy efficiency domains. Andrew holds a Bachelor of Applied Science (Mechanical Engineering) and a Masters in Business Administration degree.View Andrew Haughian's profile on LinkedIn

What is Your Materials MVP?

Posted by on in Advanced Materials

A Minimal Viable Product (MVP), is a new product that can be rapidly developed in order to efficiently test the value proposition with real customers. The ultimate goal is to accelerate the innovation cycle towards creating the real home run. Eric Ries originally outlined this methodology in his book, “The Lean Startup”, and it has inspired the formation of countless software start-ups that can deliver that MVP with pizza-fueled coding marathons. But for companies looking to commercialize products based on advanced materials, there are typically a myriad of technical, commercial, and regulatory roadblocks that make executing on a MVP much more difficult and time consuming. But this concept is too valuable to be ignored by early stage advanced materials enabled companies.

The Future in Storage is Long (Part 2)

Posted by on in Energy

Lithium Ion technology has a huge head start in the energy storage market. While many of the cost reductions are behind us, costs over time will continue to drop. (Part 1) Nevertheless, our entrepreneurial world is full of companies who have looked at that chemistry and said, “There has got to be a better way!”

The Future in Storage is Long

Posted by on in Energy

Can you imagine producing a product of value and being forced to pay someone to take it off your hands? Well, that is the situation that some renewable energy producers have faced over the last year. Now, this typically occurs during lower demand periods, perhaps when a particularly gusty weather front rolls through. But as renewable penetration increases, the phenomenon will proliferate unless an adequate storage buffer is put in place. Fortunately this is starting to occur. According to GTM and the Energy Storage Association, US energy storage installations increased in 2015 by 243% over the previous year with the installation of 221 MW of capacity, over half of that occurring in the last quarter.

Renowned futurist Ray Kurzweil has made some eye-popping predictions about the future of human longevity. For example, by 2030 he predicts average lifespans will grow by one annum per annum. This progress will accelerate rapidly and not too long after, the average person can expect to live for 1,000 years. Now, if having a swarm of nanobots floating around your body repairing cells and damaged DNA seems a little far fetched, it may be comforting to learn that in the meantime, biomaterials innovators have some tricks up their sleeve to help our aging population better heal from disease, trauma, and wear-and-tear. Advanced materials have long played a role in western medicine with ubiquitous products such as cardiac stents, artificial joints, hemodialysis membranes, and artificial heart valves. But biomaterials innovation is accelerating just as pharmaceutical innovation struggles in the context of high technical risk, long timelines, and pushback on ever-increasing treatment costs. As healthcare budgets are increasingly constrained, will these biomaterial innovations turn us all into the Six Million Dollar Man (as seen on the television show about a former astronaut filled with implants, which aired four decades ago) or are they a potential savior to a healthcare system under strain? Let’s take a look at where biomaterials have a big role to play:

The Threes C's of CO2

Posted by on in Sustainability

As we enter into yet another global summit on climate change, this time in Paris over the next month, I am expecting the pattern of previous summits to continue. Backroom deals, posturing, pointing figures, smiling photo ops, speeches, and all of the other things politicians do well. But my faith in this summit actually driving any meaningful reductions five to ten years out is very low, in the context of a world with falling energy prices and national balance sheets requiring growth at all costs. I fall in the camp that believes market driven technology is needed if the climate change problem is to ever be solved. Unfortunately, CO2, a key greenhouse gas (GHG), is a highly stable molecule. Both capturing and converting it to a product of value is typically an uphill battle with highly prohibitive costs. But living plants have evolved over billions of years to become highly efficient users of this gas, so what's stopping us from figuring out how to do the same? Let's see what a few smart people around the world are working on every day:

Portfolio Spotlight: CarbonCure

Posted by on in Video



BNN interview with CarbonCure CEO Robert Niven.  CarbonCure retrofits concrete plants with a technology that recycles waste carbon dioxide to make affordable, greener concrete products.

Accelerating the 2D Unicorn

Posted by on in Advanced Materials

The hottest field in the world of advanced materials today is 3D printing. But this has been a long time coming. Hideo Kodama of Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research first developed additive manufacturing equipment and materials in1981. This original work closely resembles the stereolithography technique pioneered by Charles Hull that remains a dominant technique today. Despite the promising future at the time of this original work, it wasn’t until 27 years later, in 2008, that the additive manufacturing industry finally surpassed one billion dollars in revenue, a key threshold in becoming mainstream. Borrowing from Silicon Valley, I’ll use the term “revenue unicorn” for this milestone. Since that time, there has been no looking back.

Thermoelectrics Deserve Some Heat

Posted by on in Energy

Would you be surprised to learn that the most advanced economy in the world is only forty percent efficient at utilizing its key input?   Shockingly, of the 100 Quads of energy consumed in the United States in 2014, only 40 quads performed useful services such as cooling a building or transporting the kids to soccer practice.  The remaining was lost as heat.  A shameful waste or a tremendous opportunity?   

Prying Open the Licensing Toolkit

Posted by on in Venture Capital

As discussed last week in my blog entitled Add Licensing to your Business Model Toolkit, licensing is an important tool for the advanced materials start-up CEO. However as I pointed out last week, concerns about value capture and loss of market influence cannot be ignored if the goal is to build a valuable and important business capable of generating venture capital returns. Furthermore, when licensing technologies in energy or industrial markets that often place less value on IP compared to IP-centric businesses such as IT and biotech., deal creativity can be the order of the day. The four tactics described below should be considered in formulating a start-up company licensing strategy:

Venture capital investments in “hardware” companies such as advanced materials start-ups have typically focused on productization and scale-up as the key value creation activities. Partnering in the form of joint ventures, joint development or distribution agreements have traditionally been the business model of choice. Licensing models are often shunned with the argument being that you leave money on the table and your ability to influence is lost while fate is determined by corporate and market forces beyond your control. Valid points! But these issues can often be mitigated and should be weighed against the advantages of licensing, of course in the context of the market dynamics and industry structure that is faced.